Penetrating the Fog: Analytics in Learning and Education

EDUCAUSE

“Attempts to imagine the future of education often emphasize new technologies—ubiquitous computing devices, flexible classroom designs, and innovative visual displays. But the most dramatic factor shaping the future of higher education is something that we can’t actually touch or see: big data and analytics. Basing decisions on data and evidence seems stunningly obvious, and indeed, research indicates that data-driven decision-making improves organizational output and productivity.1 For many leaders in higher education, however, experience and “gut instinct” have a stronger pull.”

 

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/penetrating-fog-analytics-learning-and-education

ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology

ECAR/EDUCAUSE

“ECAR has surveyed undergraduate students annually since 2004 about technology in higher education. In 2013, ECAR collaborated with more than 250 higher education institutions to collect responses from more than 112,000 undergraduate students about their technology experiences and expectations. The findings are distilled into four broad themes to help educators and higher education institutions better understand how students experience technology on their respective campuses and the ways in which new, better, or more technology can impact students’ relationship with information technology.”

https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERS1302/ERS1302.pdf

What MOOCs mean to today’s students and institutions

ECAR/EDUCAUSE

“This research bulletin uses data from ECAR research on students and IT and on e-learning to paint a picture of the role MOOCs currently play in higher education and the directions MOOCs might be heading. The bulletin provides current motivations and obstacles for MOOCs, a perspective about how MOOCs relate to e-learning more generally, and data about the kinds of students who participate in MOOCs. Also included are findings about the value proposition of MOOCs, both for students and for institutions, as well as questions institutions might ask themselves when considering MOOCs.”

http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/what-moocs-mean-today’s-students-and-institutions

What’s Next for Campus Cyberinfrastructure? ACTI Responds to the NSF ACCI Reports.

EDUCAUSE

“In February 2009, a joint workshop of the EDUCAUSE Advanced Core Technologies Initiative Campus Cyberinfrastructure Working Group (ACTI-CCI) and the Coalition for Academic Scientific Computation (CASC) issued a report and recommendations that addressed the challenges and strategies for developing a coherent cyberinfrastructure from local campus to national facilities. The report concluded that it is not only practical but also optimal to solve a large number of computational problems at the campus level.The joint report immediately preceded the formation of six task forces by the NSF-wide Advisory Committee for Cyberinfrastructure (ACCI), which were charged with investigating long-term cyberinfrastructure issues.”

http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/whats-next-campus-cyberinfrastructure-acti-responds-nsf-acci-reports

The Innovative University: Changing the DNA of Higher Education

EDUCAUSE

“For most of their histories, traditional colleges and universities have had no serious competition except from institutions with similar operating models. For the first time, though, disruptive technologies are at work in higher education as competitors are offering online courses and degrees. Clayton Christensen, Kim B. Clark Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School and Henry J. Eyring, vice president for advancement at Brigham Young University—Idaho, describe the evolution of the widely influential Harvard model, and note the disruptive potential of online degree providers as evidenced by their divergence from that model. They encourage institutions to commit to real innovation by changing their DNA from the inside out, and discourage them from trying to excel at too much as they attempt to climb ahead of their competitors. Instead, they recommend that traditional universities adopt a pattern of continuous innovation focused on their unique mission—without undue concern for either tradition or what other institutions are doing.1”